Deviant Login Shop
 Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
December 8, 2009
Image Size
569 KB
Resolution
800×1100
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
4,172 (1 today)
Favourites
42 (who?)
Comments
2
Downloads
134
×
"Khublai Khan" by bitrix-studio "Khublai Khan" by bitrix-studio
From the comics "Khublai Khan"

"Cherished from Mandate of Heaven, the Great Mongol emperor sends this letter to the King of Japan. The sovereigns of small countries, sharing borders with each other, have for a long time been concerned to communicate with each other and become friendly. Especially since my ancestor governed at heaven's command. Innumerable counties from afar disputed our power and slighted our virtue. Goryeo rendered thanks for my ceasefire and for restoring their land and people when I ascended the throne. Our relation is feudatory like a father and son. We think you already know this. Goryeo is my eastern tributary. Japan was allied with Goryeo, and sometimes with China, since the founding of your country. However, Japan has never dispatched ambassadors since my ascending the throne. It is horrifying to think that the Kingdom is yet to know this. Hence we dispatched a mission with our letter particularly expressing our wishes. Enter into friendly relations with each other from now on. We think all countries belong to one family. How are we in the right, unless we comprehend this? Nobody would wish to resort to arms"
:iconcamurray:
CAMurray Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2010
Exceptional job on this picture. I enjoy the attention to details, from the armor to the figures to the weapons.

Japanese warriors had, until the Mongol invasions, fought battles by way of individual duels. So you can imagine how pathetic they must have seemed when, one by one, samurai challenged the whole Mongol navy and got killed in the process. Hmm... makes you want to change you tactics, doesn't it?

And so they did. The Daimyo armies soon decided to focus on large-scale battles with whole armies fighting each other on the battlefield. The Mongol invasions taught the Japanese many other lessons, including the fact that you shouldn't expect the Shogun to reimburse you when all the spoils of war have sunk into the deep abyss of the sea. This, among other things, led to the overthrow of the Kamakura (Minamoto) shogunate, and eventually to the founding of the Muromachi (Ashikaga) shogunate, with the Nanbokucho period in-between.
Reply
:iconsupra4mn:
supra4mn Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2010
great great great
Reply
Add a Comment: